A class on engineering, electronics, and the Maker Mindset

At my school, rather than pass through grade levels, students have levels of autonomy – from “Explorers” who do mostly teacher-directed projects and products, to “Pathfinders” who do almost completely student-created projects and products, and job internships. I’m teaching an “Explorer” level class, so I’m introducing new learners to things they might not have known they would like but we’re asking them to try it. Other teachers with Explorer classes are doing things like creating pollinator boxes, producing a play, and studying floodplains. My venture project is called “Whimsical Inventions” and it’s a class about learning how to be a maker and a tinkerer. I began by presenting content about coding, electronics and circuitry, 3-D design, and doing research… but also teaching about the mindset of an inventor. Inventors solve problems, true, but inventors also make things because making things is joyful. We make stuff that is a little over-engineered because it makes us and others happy. We take everyday things and make them more beautiful, musical, entertaining, weird, or funny. If you’re making a thing to be happy, you’re more likely to take risks, to try something that might not work, to iterate on your design and make it better. This is the premise behind the class. To learn about coding, electronics, design, and engineering for the smiles.

As students finish with their final projects I am just feeling so blessed with the circumstances I got to teach in. The kids have come a long way with coding and Arduino. My makerspace is buzzing with 3-D printers and the laser cutter. Kids solder skillfully and safely. And they are doing a great job cleaning up and putting things away. I was lucky to get a class in which many kids were interested in the topic but many others just got placed there to try something new. My class is evenly split between boys and girls. It’s mixed-age with kids ranging from 6th grade to 10th grade. And I have gifted kids, kids with IEP’s, second-language learners, kids from all areas of town. It is just awesome. When I have a diverse group of learners I am a very happy teacher and this has been a phenomenal group.

And look at some of the fun stuff they’re making! One child is making a 3-D printed ferris wheel with a stepper motor and some LED’s. It’s coming along well! She downloaded the Ferris wheel design from Thingiverse.

Another student is making a motion-activated Moo machine. You know those cylinders that you tip upside down and it moos? He’s going to attach it to a servo and mount it in a stand with a motion sensor on it. When you walk by it will moo at you! Here’s the base beginning to print. He designed it himself!

A pair of students is making a light-up holder for your Instax photos. They’ve learned to solder and program these RGB LED strips and they’re going to mount some clips here to show off their photos. Another girl is using the same idea to make a light-up phone case. She has printed several iterations of the perfect phone case to make sparkly with the LED strips.

I have one pair of students that decided to make their own battery-powered car. They designed the car chassis themselves and soldered together the battery packs and switch and motors, and they’re doing to attach wheels and I’m just so excited to see how it turns out.

It’s just been fun. Part of our requirement for the project is that kids have to do a research project as well, and I’ve found that they really are engaged in their research which I didn’t expect. Early on in the class we did readings and watched videos on the value of tinkering and inventing useless things – we watched videos from Simone Giertz, Adam Savage, Ayah Bdeir and others. One of my favorites is this TED Talk from Steven Johnson which tells the story of how seemingly useless inventions can change the world. I’ve taught electronics classes before, but this is the first time I’ve really focused on teaching the mindset of an inventor, and I really think it has positively shaped the culture of the class. When I reflected on the times I learned the most and grew the most as a maker, those times tended to happen when I was making something I personally cared about but was just a fun side job, a useless invention. I hoped to give my students that same experience. I really believe most of them are, and it’s a very happy class to teach.

Sometimes when I’ve taught engineering classes before, the classes would end up being not very diverse (kids tend to sign up who already know they will like it, and I tended to have mostly boys in those classes), and I never felt like I had time to teach about maker culture. With a diverse class and making the culture/mindset front and center in the learning, it’s been a very fun experience and I can’t wait to show you how the exhibition products turn out.

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About dupriestmath

I'm a former software engineer who has taught middle school math and computer science for the past 6 years. I believe every kid has the right to be a thinker. I started this blog to save resources for integrating programming in the Common Core math classroom. I also use it to save my lessons and reflections from teaching budding computer scientists! Coding has transformed how I teach and think. You'll love what it does for you. You should try it.

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