New Semester Musings

Well, I have successfully (?) survived my first semester at a startup school. It wasn’t always pretty, I’m a little bruised, but I have some changes I am ready to make. Here they are.

  1. I am determined to get better quality work from my students. I think the students I had in my venture project class enjoyed the course and made creative projects, but I was disappointed in the quality if I’m being very honest. Their communication products were especially poor. Without a good poster, presentation, or research paper to accompany your project, it kind of looks like a 4th grade diorama. And some of the projects even by the 8th – 10th graders kind of looked like 4th grade dioramas. As a staff, we came to some common understandings about what makes good research – and I will also spend some time digging up exemplars and industry examples that the kids can look to for inspiration. Communication will be a full third of their “grade” for their projects and I need to leave enough time at the end of the semester to work on this piece instead of squealing into the exhibition still throwing hot glue on a project.
  2. I’ve carved out my space. I really needed part of a classroom to call my own, and I kind of took over the makerspace in the school. I needed to feel like I had some ownership over my little section of the building, in order to take pride in the work that takes place there. I hung posters, organized all of the shelves, set up the 3-D printers and sewing machines, carved out some space for student projects, and I made little journals for the kids. We were in such a rush to open the building that a lot of this basic stuff just got left. Living in a pile of clutter and unfinished setup is stressful on its own. Now things are organized and set up and I am calmer. I also recognize that claiming space is a big part of what gives the kids ownership in the school, so I’ll look for ways the students can display their work and label their own areas.
  3. I set up protocols for the makerspace. Because of our disorganization last semester, a lot of our equipment was used carelessly. Students would just grab anything from jumper wires to knitting needles to impact wrenches and either use them incorrectly or fidget with them. For any equipment that is either dangerous or delicate, I’ve set up a 3-tier badging system. A level 1 badge means you can follow a basic tutorial to use the tool with support. A level 2 badge means you can use the tool independently. A level 3 badge means you can troubleshoot the tool and also teach others to use it. When you have reached level 3, you can use the tool without staff supervision and also teach other students how to use it. I posted lists of our students that have level 3 badges next to everything – the 3D printers, the sewing machines, the Glowforge, the soldering irons, the podcasting system. Currently the lists are empty, but as students level up, they can start using the tools independently and showing their friends what to do.
  4. I think I have the start of a really fun venture project. This quarter’s venture project asks the question “What does it mean to be a Maker?” I toyed with the idea of having the students make inventions that were purposeful and noble, but when I reflected on how I got started as a “Maker”, I realized I only started being able to make purposeful things after I had spent some time tinkering and making a bunch of crappy things. I needed to have the permission and courage to use tools to make things that were lousy but fun and interesting to me. So the secondary title is “Useless Inventions”. We’ll learn about Arduino and micro:bits and 3D printing, and we’ll visit Fort Collins’ Creator Hub, and as the kids’ final project they will make their very own Useless Invention. It should be joyful and interesting but it’s perfectly OK if it’s crappy. Making a few crappy, entertaining things will help them build resilience and grit in a non-threatening way. The inspiration is this TED talk by Simone Giertz. When I’ve pitched this idea to students, they have been VERY excited about it and rattled off a list of a few things they’d like to make. A jellybean cannon. A fantasy carousel. A jump-scare machine. A virtual aquarium. I want them to appreciate the Maker Mindset and get involved in the open-source community. The students will share and publish their projects, giving credit to whatever inspired them. They can publish tutorials on a site like “instructables”, or even make YouTube videos. I’ve got a formal planning document but that’s the gist of the project.

It’s late and I will write more about venture project and what I expect from math this quarter… I’ll do that part later. I see my first group of students tomorrow and I ought to get some rest.

Goodnight!

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About dupriestmath

I'm a former software engineer who has taught middle school math and computer science for the past 6 years. I believe every kid has the right to be a thinker. I started this blog to save resources for integrating programming in the Common Core math classroom. I also use it to save my lessons and reflections from teaching budding computer scientists! Coding has transformed how I teach and think. You'll love what it does for you. You should try it.

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