Arduino Final Projects by Middle Schoolers

This was my 3rd semester teaching an Electronics class for 7th and 8th graders, and I’m learning more and more every time I teach it.  In this class, I want students to learn the basics of electricity, circuits, and programming – and I also want them to learn a maker mindset. How to invent, remix, tinker, recover from setbacks, persist through difficulties, use your resources, collaborate with others. How to teach yourself what you need to know. How to present your project to others so they can build on it and make it even better.

I use some formal lessons, but this class is not as structured as a programming or computer science class. For the most part, students are given resources and inquiry questions, and they use the resources to teach themselves what they need to know. Everyone starts in a different place. Everyone has different needs. I want them to create something challenging that they’re proud of – a launching point for future exploration and learning in the world of invention.

I love the projects the kids made! Many made interactive holiday displays, and I got a great variety of others including videogame-themed projects, an LED cube, games, and even a car.  I created a simple Google Sites page to showcase their work.

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MIDDLE SCHOOL ELECTRONICS FINAL PROJECTS

I also have some reflections on the semester and the class in general. The learning is just as good for me as it is for the kids.

  • Purposeful learning: I believe in giving the students a good foundation in circuits such as understanding measurements and parallel and series circuits. However, students report to me that they find the beginning of the class “boring” and I don’t think I connect it well to the Arduino projects later. I’ve been involved with a project called Engineering Brightness, spearheaded by Tracey Winey, our media specialist, and John Howe, our assistant principal. It’s part extracurricular and part co-curricular, where students build lanterns in our school’s makerspace to send to third-world countries. My kids get involved with the EB program through soldering lessons, field trips, and guest talks and Skype sessions, but it has not been fully interwoven into the class up to this point. Tracey and I have been planning to co-teach this coming semester – we’ll use the EB project to teach basic circuitry and the innovator’s mindset, and infuse cultural/global awareness into Electronics class. I’m really excited about making this partnership stronger. The kids will understand the circuitry much better with this style of learning. Imagine learning about serial and parallel circuits, volts and amps by designing your own lantern for other people. They will love what they’re doing and find it more purposeful. There’s a good body of research that shows this is how to draw girls into engineering, too.
  • Open-source culture: The open nature of Arduino is what makes the platform so beautiful to work with. I have encouraged students to remix found projects and to share their work, but haven’t really tapped into the community to make their sharing more real. One thought I have here is that there is a style of communication that comes with sharing projects. Look at good projects you find on instructables.com, or ehow.com, or youtube or any of the Arduino sharing sites. Look at some that are not as well done. There’s a structure and a style that makes your project accessible, interesting, replicable, and fun. Kids in the modern world need to learn to communicate in the medium that best suits their work, to code-switch and adapt their style as needed. I wonder how to teach open-source sharing and communication to middle schoolers. I would love to make the writing and video editing and photography and commenting a really key part of the class, as I’m not satisfied with the work I’m getting at the moment. It would be so important for the Engineering Brightness part of the curriculum as well as the Arduino part.
  • Appropriate level of challenge: I ran into challenges you always run into with a project-based class. Some students got in over their head and tried to do too much. Some kids who were perfectly capable of finding answers on their own raised their hands many times each class and waited for me to help them. Some finished early with a half-baked project that didn’t meet requirements but did not want to challenge themselves further. Work was shared unevenly between partners. Some finished early and asked me what they should do for the next three class periods. Some pushed the deadline right up until the last minute of the last day of class. Some did not understand how to read rubrics or project guidelines. I expect all of these challenges each semester, and sometimes I do a good job working with these situations, but not always. I continue to look for good structures for project-based learning. It’s really hard with one of me. This may be a great opportunity for me and my teaching partner next semester to put some good practices in place for the kids.

 

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About dupriestmath

I'm a former software engineer who has taught middle school math and computer science for the past 6 years. I believe every kid has the right to be a thinker. I started this blog to save resources for integrating programming in the Common Core math classroom. I also use it to save my lessons and reflections from teaching budding computer scientists! Coding has transformed how I teach and think. You'll love what it does for you. You should try it.

4 responses to “Arduino Final Projects by Middle Schoolers”

  1. kmoch says :

    Really love this post on Arduinos – can you share a link to the Google Site you created for your students work??? Thx

  2. Chris says :

    Hi there. I am interested in learning more about how your school structures its classes. Are CS classes all electives or are some mandatory? How often and for how long do your classes meet?

    I’m just curious. I work at a very small school and I’m trying to integrate more CS into what we do.

    Thanks!

    • dupriestmath says :

      Hi Chris, this is how our school does it for now, but the state of tech ed here and in other schools is constantly changing. 🙂

      We have a required technology class in 6th grade that lasts a quarter. It meets every other day for 90 minutes. Kids learn basic programming principles using Scratch, plus online research and spreadsheets and keyboarding.

      We have a computer science elective and an electronics elective. These are for 7th and 8th graders. These classes are one semester long, every other day for 90 minutes. We get into text-based programming and physical computing, as well as how the internet works and web design.

      There are other elective and enrichment activities for kids to pick up computer science, coding, robotics and other computing skills. These are just the ones I spend most of my time on. The only actual technology requirement for kids in grades 6-12 is the 6th grade quarterly tech class. Everything else from that point on is elective.

      But it’s evolving fast.

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