First Annual Code-a-Thon for CSEdWeek

Computer Science Education Week is quickly approaching, and this year we want to go a little beyond the classroom hour-of-code events (which we are still doing). My school has decided to host its first mini-hackathon, which we’re calling a code-a-thon! I have seen announcements for hackathons in my area before and the idea is always intriguing, but I’ve never actually attended one – so this is a big leap, hosting one without ever actually seeing what a hackathon is like. Our awesome media specialist and I are pulling it together and hoping to learn from the experience.

Here is what we have decided so far.

  • We will have two categories: Beginner and Advanced. Beginners can be complete newcomers who have never coded before. Advanced coders have a semester of computer science or the equivalent.
  • Teams will be 3-5 students.
  • First thing in the morning, we’ll make introductions, set up norms, and reveal the theme. The theme will be very broad (the examples I use with students are “sports” or “space exploration”).
  • Students will have 20 minutes or so to brainstorm what they would like to make.
  • They can make anything they want as long as it has to do with the theme, and it is created with code. Any coding language is fine. We will provide access to robots and Arduinos if they wish to use them. Students can use Scratch or Code Studio, or Python or JavaScript or any other language. Web design tools such as Weebly do not count as “code” but can be used to enhance their project. Some ideas include games, interactive flash cards, simulations, trivia, animations, educational programs, etc.
  • We will provide some technical mentors that can help students. Students will get a token or a flag they can turn in to receive a certain amount of time with a technical mentor. They should use it when they really need it!
  • We’ll have breaks for snacks and drinks and movement.
  • Students will get to present their projects to the judges for a short amount of time (3-5 minutes depending on number of teams).
  • Judges will score projects in these categories: Problem Identification / Requirements, Usefulness of Solution, Creativity, Teamwork, and Technical Quality.
  • Winners will receive prizes. Everyone will get food and publicity.

I teach a required sixth-grade tech class so I’m able to pump it up and give the code-a-thon some good publicity in class. I have also appeared on the morning announcements to advertise and give computer science trivia questions. I set up a table at lunch with some signs and sign-up forms.

The turnout was amazing! 116 kids signed up!  63 of them were girls! We are going to need to actually cut some kids from the code-a-thon… what a bummer, but what a great problem to have!

Signing up for the code-a-thon. Groups of friends registered together.

Signing up for the code-a-thon. Groups of friends registered together.

We’re excited to see how the event goes and what kinds of programs the students create. My vision is to create a culture at the school where computer programming is seen as a normal problem-solving tool used by everyone, and not a fringe activity for supersmart kids. I’m so, so encouraged by what I have seen with the code-a-thon signups. Really fun to see kids round up friends at the lunch tables and bring everyone over to register to spend a morning coding. I hope the event goes well, and I will definitely post updates as we get closer!

 

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About dupriestmath

I'm a former software engineer who has taught middle school math and computer science for the past 6 years. I believe every kid has the right to be a thinker. I started this blog to save resources for integrating programming in the Common Core math classroom. I also use it to save my lessons and reflections from teaching budding computer scientists! Coding has transformed how I teach and think. You'll love what it does for you. You should try it.

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  1. Computer Science Education Week at Preston | Coding In Math Class - December 15, 2015

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