Learning to Code in MinecraftEDU with Turtles

I haven’t posted about my Minecraft class / experiment in a while, but this has been a really interesting class to work with. My Minecraft class is a 40-minute period every other day, for a semester. Our enrichment period is not graded and is intended to be a time when teachers and students learn something interesting together. For example, teachers have classes on knitting, beading, Lego robots, ultimate frisbee, fly fishing, creative writing, and film. I have Minecraft. I wanted to use the class to explore the question “what can you learn from Minecraft?”

Since I’m a CS teacher, one interesting teaching tool that jumped out at me was the ComputerCraft mod (See a Video here) and the Turtles. I could see them as a unique introduction to programming and computational thinking. I had my class do the Turtle Island mission (which took four classes) and Turtle Canyon (which took two).  We enjoyed these pre-created missions. As a busy teacher, I was happy someone else took the time to create them and that they were so engaging and interesting for the kids. Many of the kids “died” multiple times and just kept trying to use their turtles to solve the puzzles.

The spawn point for Turtle Island. We had to install the CustomNPC mod on everyone's machine before we could use it, but the payoff was worth it because the characters help you with the missions and give you rewards.

The spawn point for Turtle Island. We had to install the CustomNPC mod on everyone’s machine before we could use it, but the payoff was worth it because the characters help you with the missions and give you rewards.

Next, I downloaded a world from the server that had ten building areas (Actually, it was this Volume Challenge with the extra buildings and things removed). I assigned the students to a numbered area with a small group. The world was set up so the students could not build or dig – but turtles could. I filled their inventories with supplies and gave them a short program to copy, and for three or four classes they could build whatever they wanted with the turtles. When you give middle-schoolers a prompt to “build whatever you want”, you get some fascinating things.

Many students used turtle remote mode almost exclusively. Some wrote very simple programs. But then some got a little more courageous with programming and made some interesting things with the turtles.

Houses, farms, pyramids, a strange creation of black wool, all made by turtles.

Houses, farms, pyramids, a strange creation of black wool, all made by turtles.

One group seemed to have a program to build a level of a house, and they ran it twice to get this weird structure with floating walls. Another group had a program to create walls and another program to create stairs. They ran this program anywhere they could.

One group seemed to have a program to build a level of a house, and they ran it twice to get this weird structure with floating walls. They also leveled their ground with the turtles. Another group had a program to create walls and another program to create stairs. They ran this program anywhere they could.

Most of the programs were very simple, but I did see some experimentation with nested loops, and with programs calling other programs. I wonder what kind of reasoning skills we’re building here. Why 19? Why 40? So many questions.

2015-10-28_18.03.10

Nested “Repeat” blocks in the graphical turtle language in Minecraft. This program uses move and place blocks to build… four walls?

I am currently teaching some turtle lessons to my Robotics class, justifying it by telling myself “they’re virtual robots”!  This has some advantages over real robots – no parts to throw or break, for example. This is a graded class and so I have to approach it differently. I’m still working out how I am going to assess their knowledge of robotics principles via Minecraft. I will create a final project assignment. What should the guidelines and expectations be for a Minecraft robotics project? I am making the class more academic by including lessons like this one.

WARM UP LESSON ON TURTLES

Kids used the link above and analyzed the programs, and made predictions about what they do. Then I opened Turtle Canyon and found each of the turtles with the programs in the document, and we ran them. We took another look at the code to match what the turtle did with the code. The group discussions helped me understand the programs a lot, and I hope to see the robotics kids being more adventurous with their coding as a result of the lessons.

You learn other things too, besides programming – and it’s what makes Minecraft such a confusing, but enriching, world to play in. I love it when lessons are nice and tidy and you have a certain goal and you’re laser-focused on that goal. But in Minecraft, you have to stay flexible with your goals. Some days, you’ll learn about robotics. On some days, you will learn anger management. Some days, teamwork. Some days, resource management. Self-advocacy. Information literacy. Conflict resolution. General persistence and resourcefulness. So I have to keep in mind that if a kid didn’t make much progress with programming, it was because their learning was happening in another area.

I leave you with this picture of my pixelated students interacting with their turtles building a house.

Turtles... so darn cute and programmable

Turtles… so darn cute and programmable

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About dupriestmath

I'm a former software engineer who has taught middle school math and computer science for the past 6 years. I believe every kid has the right to be a thinker. I started this blog to save resources for integrating programming in the Common Core math classroom. I also use it to save my lessons and reflections from teaching budding computer scientists! Coding has transformed how I teach and think. You'll love what it does for you. You should try it.

3 responses to “Learning to Code in MinecraftEDU with Turtles”

  1. aakashrajdahal says :

    Cool. It’s awesome that many schools out there have added MineCraft in schools for students to play with. I wish we had it in school here (Nepal) ! Anyways ,good luck with your class. Happy Craftin’ 🙂

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